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Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple, raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest

 

I read your article about Korbinian Apple and am looking to get a tree or scion wood …. any idea or help in finding such would be appreciated. Although I know it will become a different variety, I would ultimately settle for finding seeds, but that isn’t my ideal. The story of Father Korbinian is great and I want to celebrate that.

Matt Jackson

Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple was raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest, between 1941 and 1945 when he was a prisoner in a German concentration camp; it became widely planted in Bavaria, but was not named until 1985. For more details see our main website and here : The Apple Priest Korbinian Aigner

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Pomeganate fruiting in North London

Pomegranate trees rarely fruit in England out of doors, but this years’s summer has resulted in a crop of ripe fruit on a tree growing in North London.

Has anyone else discovered a pomegranate that has produced fruit this year?

Mary Rawitzer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more news of pomegrantes fruiting in UK see our main web-site: http://www.fruitforum.net/articles/pomegranates-in-england

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Dr Hogg’s Fruit Manual, reprint of 1884 edition

Readers of this Blog may be interested to know Robert Hogg’s Fruit Manual; A Guide to the Fruits and Fruit Trees of Great Britain, facsimile edition, once £40, has been remaindered, and is now obtainable from http://www.psbooks.co.uk for £8.99 plus pp £2. Catalogue no. 298, book no.505752.

Jim Streeton

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Now reprinted 2018

Rivers Nursery of Sawbridgeworth: the Art of Practical Pomology by Elizabeth Waugh was first published in 2009. The book went out of print for a while, but we are delighted to tell you that it has been reprinted and is available once again. When first published, in 2009, we reviewed it on our main website under the title ‘The Rivers Nursery of Sawbridgeworth‘. There was also an article about the conservation of a remaining orchard on the site of the Nursery on this Blog: – ‘The Rescued Orchard and the Rivers Heritage’ by Paul Read. For more information on the Rivers Heritage Site and Orchard go to: www.rhso.co.uk

In brief this is a book of 200 pages illustrated with old photographs and maps. It is the story of an outstanding contributor to the history of fruit growing in Britain. A long-established family firm (1725 – 1987), the Thomas Rivers directors and the many local men and women who worked on the land and in the greenhouses developed the Conference pear and Early Rivers plum as well as apple varieties and oranges. The agricultural history of East Hertfordshire is entwined with the rise and fall of the business.

To purchase this book for £15 plus p&p, email www.rhso.co.uk

Fruit Forum

 

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Spoorwegster or Railway Star apple

Spoorwegster, meaning Railway Star, is the latest chance apple seedling to enter nursery lists. It was spotted growing alongside a railway line in Limburg, Belgium by Joseph Grouwels, who took some cuttings and grafted new trees for his garden. Grouwels brought this brilliantly colourful apple to the notice of the NBS (Nationale Boogaartenstichting). They were impressed, propagated trees and included it in the list of varieties they sell. As well as being remarkable for its colour, Spoorwegster/Railway Star apple will keep well into the New Year, even in amateur stores. Probably a seedling of the famous Belgian apple Reinette Rouge Etoilé, which it resembles, except that it lasts longer and is a more striking colour. The star-shaped ‘dots’, lenticels, which give Reinette Rouge Etoilé its name, however, are less prominent. Its taste is said to be good.

Fruit Forum

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Morello cherry 23 April 2018 at National Fruit Collection, Kent. In flower 10 April 2017.

Here in North East Wales, no doubt due to the long chilly spring, we all have experienced in the UK, I have the peculiar anomaly this year of every early flowering fruit tree being late to flower and catching up with the later flowering trees.
 I cannot recall this unusual happening before but I have only kept accurate records from when I moved here in 2006. I’m keeping a record of what will and what won’t grow here in the Vale of Clwyd where we have a micro-climate and unusually low rainfall for North Wales.
 Things are certainly looking toward a bonus crop of fruit for me this year if the later fruit set on the peach and apricots is anything to go by.
 The hot dry weather from last week has pretty much suddenly burst everything into blossom in an overlapping cycle of events. The plums just overlapping the pears and the cherries overlapping the apples.

Right at this moment on the 27th April I have just into blossom 4 out of 6 apple trees, Charlotte first into flower on 24th April with Scrumptious, followed by Flamenco on 26th, Greensleeves is just opening its first flower buds today. The two Laxton Superb trees are just at the pink bud stage this year.
 Four pears: Beth was first with masses of blossom open on the 21st April this year, followed by Conference, Comice, and Williams’ still in flower.
 Also still in blossom 8 plum trees: Denbigh Plum, 2 Jubileum plum, Marjorie’s Seedling (also a mass of blossom this week), 2 Opal plums, Ontario plum and Victoria. The Victoria and the two Jubileum plums were first to flower this year on 18th April, closely followed by Opal and Denbigh, last was Marjorie’s Seedling on the 24th April. Cherries in flowering sequence this year were: Summer Sun, Early Rivers, 21st April, then Kordia on 23rd, Stella and Morello just starting to flower this week on 26th April.
 All three Apricots (2 Tomcot and 1 Large Early) and peach Redhaven all flowered later, in early March (under cover).

Philip Lunt

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Beth pear April 2018

I can report masses of pear blossom on virtually all of my sixty odd varieties of pear growing in Nottingham. It is without doubt the best for years. Following a bonus of four hot days to get pollinating going, now I ask myself – will the limited amount of bees cope? Fingers crossed no radiation frosts or the return of the ‘Beast from the East’.

Are pears doing well everywhere?

Adrian Baggaley

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