Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘apple’

 

Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple, raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest

 

I read your article about Korbinian Apple and am looking to get a tree or scion wood …. any idea or help in finding such would be appreciated. Although I know it will become a different variety, I would ultimately settle for finding seeds, but that isn’t my ideal. The story of Father Korbinian is great and I want to celebrate that.

Matt Jackson

Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple was raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest, between 1941 and 1945 when he was a prisoner in a German concentration camp; it became widely planted in Bavaria, but was not named until 1985. For more details see our main website and here : The Apple Priest Korbinian Aigner.   At the bottom of this article a number of German nurseries selling trees are listed

Info@BaumschuleRitthaler.de
schwerdtfeger-obst@t-online.de
pflanzlust@t-online.de

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Spoorwegster or Railway Star apple

Spoorwegster, meaning Railway Star, is the latest chance apple seedling to enter nursery lists. It was spotted growing alongside a railway line in Limburg, Belgium by Joseph Grouwels, who took some cuttings and grafted new trees for his garden. Grouwels brought this brilliantly colourful apple to the notice of the NBS (Nationale Boogaartenstichting). They were impressed, propagated trees and included it in the list of varieties they sell. As well as being remarkable for its colour, Spoorwegster/Railway Star apple will keep well into the New Year, even in amateur stores. Probably a seedling of the famous Belgian apple Reinette Rouge Etoilé, which it resembles, except that it lasts longer and is a more striking colour. The star-shaped ‘dots’, lenticels, which give Reinette Rouge Etoilé its name, however, are less prominent. Its taste is said to be good.

Fruit Forum

Read Full Post »

Early Rivers cherry at the National Fruit Collection, Kent.

As we have done for a number of years, we publish the flowering dates for the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, Kent, undertaken and kindly supplied by Lorinda Jewsbury. These are the records for a selection of varieties (standards and any new accessions) from all the tree fruit collections at Brogdale.

An early start to the warm weather has really brought on the flowering for this year, as I’m sure you’re aware. The plums are roughly a couple of weeks earlier compared to last year. As an example, Victoria was in full bloom this year on 30th March – earlier than the 10th April noted for last year; the current 10 year mean (the average full bloom date) for Victoria is 8th April.

Although a number of the cherries in the Collection have yet to come into flower, the earlier varieties, again, have responded to the warm weather and Lapins reached full bloom on the 2nd April. It was the 23rd April last year and Lapins’ 10-year mean is 16th April.

The pear orchard is a sea of white once more as the trees have responded to the temperatures. Louise Bonne of Jersey, one of the early flowerers in the Pear Collection, was in full bloom on the 30th March. Last year saw it at full bloom on the 15th April, pretty much spot on for its average of 14th April.

The apples are just setting off and, of the early flowerers, Red Astrachan and Stark’s Earliest are already in full bloom. There is still a way to go yet with the Apple Collection and with the weather forecast to be a little cooler after the weekend there may be a fair gap this year between the early and late flowering varieties.

Lorinda Jewsbury

2017

PLUM

Cambridge Gage: 29th March (10% open); 30th March (full flower);

Czar: 20th March (10% open); 26th March (full flower);

Denniston’s Superb (Imperial Gage): 22nd March (10% open); 24th March (full flower);

Farleigh Damson: 25th March (10% open); 28th March (full flower);

Marjorie’s Seedling: 30th March (10% open); 1st April (full flower);

Oullins Gage: 28th March (10% open); 30th March (full flower);

Pershore Yellow Egg: 26th March (10% open); 28th March (full flower);

Victoria: 28th March (10% open); 30th March (full flower);

 

PEAR

Concorde: 5th April (10% open);

Conference: 2nd April (10% open); 5th April (full flower);

Doyenné du Comice: 3rd April (10% open); 5th April (full flower);

Louise Bonne of Jersey: 28th March (10% open); 30th March (full flower);

 

CHERRY

Early Rivers: 30th March (10% open); 2nd April (full flower);

Hertford: 3rd April (10% open);

Lapins: 30th March (10% open); 2nd April (full flower);

Merchant: 4th April (10% open);

Stella: 5th April (10% open);

Sunburst:

 

APPLE

Blenheim Orange:

Bramley’s Seedling:

Cox’s Orange Pippin:

Crawley Beauty:

Discovery:

Egremont Russet:

Falstaff:

Feuillemorte:

Fiesta/Red Pippin:

Gala:

James Grieve:

Jonagold:

Meridian:

Red Astrachan: 31st March (10% open); 2nd April (full flower);

St. Edmund’s Pippin:

Worcester Pearmain:

Read Full Post »

Can anyone help me find this rare apple variety, grown in the West Country during WWII, the fruit is the size of a large grapefruit and yellowish in colour. By all accounts the most delicious variety ever. Any ideas?

John Denham

Read Full Post »

Fuji apple growing in southern California; recommended by Kevin Hauser for growing in a warm climate

Fuji apple growing in southern California; recommended for growing in a warm climate by Kevin Hauser, who kindly supplied the picture.

I wish to grow apples, but my question is: is it possible to grow them in Tanzania?. And what are the procedures to grow apples? And what kind of seed is growing in Tanzania. Where can I get it and how much?

Hassan Nahoda

For more information on growing apples in a warm climate see our main website for an article by Kevin Hauser: http://www.fruitforum.net/apples-in-a-warm-climate.htm and also visit his own website: http://www.kuffelcreek.com/applenursery.htm

Kevin Hauser has nurseries in California and Uganda: Kuffel Creek Apple Nursery, Southern California, USA; Nakifuma, Uganda, East Africa.

Apple trees growng in Kampala (see comment by Kevin Hauser below).

Apple trees growing near Kampala, Uganda (see comment by Kevin Hauser below).

Planting apple trees in Congo

Apple trees growing in Congo (see Hauser comment below)

Read Full Post »

Discovery applesDiscovery apple

The random thought popped into my head today that apples seem to be the most ubiquitous fruit, and that anecdotes about other fruit are always compared to apples. Pomegranates are ‘Chinese apples’, peaches are ‘Persian apples’, etc.

Just how did apples become so ubiquitous?

Walter Jones

Read Full Post »

Limelight apple growing on M27 roostock

Limelight apple growing on M27 rootstock

I read the article  – ‘Little Apples Trees – grafted on M27’ by Adrian Baggaley on your main website. I would like to know more about M27. What is this M27 and where could I buy it? I garden in Malaysia.

Mokhtar Mohammad

Picture courtesy of Adrian Baggaley

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »