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Ribston Pippin blosssom

The question I’m going to ask you is a curiosity and I’m having a hard time finding information about it; maybe I didn’t know how to search well. I clarify that I am Spanish and although the English language is not unknown to me to access certain information is not easy. I am looking for the name and as much information as possible about the apple varieties that the musician Gerald Finzi cultivated on his farm in Aldbourne, Wiltshire. It’s a historical curiosity, mixed with my interest in music and one of my first works, fruit growing. I would be very grateful if you could help me.

José María Bárcena Álvarez

 

The composer Gerald Finzi collected varieties of apples and other fruits, which he planted in his Wiltshire orchard. He was a member of a group of enthusiasts who set out to rescue old fruit varieties and especially apples that they remembered, but which were fast disappearing from orchards and gardens. They were active in the 1940s and 1950s and led by Philip Morton Shand, a linguist and writer on modern architecture, wine and food. Other key players were the architect [Sir] Leslie Martin and a Miss Holliday who lived in Yorkshire. Shand wrote articles, made a broadcast and organised a network of helpers all over the country. The group built up their own collections and their discoveries of ‘rare’ fruits were given to the Fruit Collection at the Royal Horticultural Society Gardens at Wisley, Surrey the forerunner of today’s National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, Kent. For more details on the Collection see: Morgan, J., ‘Orchard Archives: The National Fruit Collection’ in Occasional Papers from the RHS Lindley Library, vol 7, pp.3-30, 2012

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Actinidia arguta Issai in flower

I have a Actinidia arguta Issai; also known as Kiwi Berry. This plant does not tolerate high potash fertilizer – the tips go a rusty colour and the leaves go brown. What should I feed it on?

Adrian Baggaley

 

Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple, raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest

 

I read your article about Korbinian Apple and am looking to get a tree or scion wood …. any idea or help in finding such would be appreciated. Although I know it will become a different variety, I would ultimately settle for finding seeds, but that isn’t my ideal. The story of Father Korbinian is great and I want to celebrate that.

Matt Jackson

Korbiniansapfe/Korbinian’s apple was raised by Korbinian Aigner (1885-1966), a Bavarian priest, between 1941 and 1945 when he was a prisoner in a German concentration camp; it became widely planted in Bavaria, but was not named until 1985. For more details see our main website and here : The Apple Priest Korbinian Aigner

Pomeganate fruiting in North London

Pomegranate trees rarely fruit in England out of doors, but this years’s summer has resulted in a crop of ripe fruit on a tree growing in North London.

Has anyone else discovered a pomegranate that has produced fruit this year?

Mary Rawitzer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more news of pomegrantes fruiting in UK see our main web-site: http://www.fruitforum.net/articles/pomegranates-in-england

Czech Republic hosted Europom in 2017 at Olomouc, organised by the Czech Union of Allotment and Leisure Gardeners

 

I have been told that several of the twenty or so apple trees in my orchard in the Czech Republic are of historical interest. Apparently a professor from Mendel University took two varieties to a conference in Geneva several years ago. Are there any links to a Czech equivalent of the local fruit groups and societies operating in England (such as the East of England Apple Orchard Project) where I could get the apples identified (preferably without too much expense) so that the trees can be cared for appropriately and perhaps DNA’d?Any assistance would be much appreciated – especially if the organisation had some English or German speakers, as I don’t speak Czech.

David Midgley

Europom 2017, the international apple festival created by the Belgian fruit society, NBS (Nationale Boomgaardenstichting) is held in a different European city every year. In 2107 it was in Olomouc, Czech Republic hosted by Czech Union of Allotment and Leisure Gardeners, which may be a good place to start. They celebrated their 60th birthday in 2017. Here is the website: http://www.zahradkari.cz/europom/en/item/11-olomouc-nabizi-historicke-pamatky-i-relax.html

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Dr Hogg’s Fruit Manual, reprint of 1884 edition

Readers of this Blog may be interested to know Robert Hogg’s Fruit Manual; A Guide to the Fruits and Fruit Trees of Great Britain, facsimile edition, once £40, has been remaindered, and is now obtainable from http://www.psbooks.co.uk for £8.99 plus pp £2. Catalogue no. 298, book no.505752.

Jim Streeton

Now reprinted 2018

Rivers Nursery of Sawbridgeworth: the Art of Practical Pomology by Elizabeth Waugh was first published in 2009. The book went out of print for a while, but we are delighted to tell you that it has been reprinted and is available once again. When first published, in 2009, we reviewed it on our main website under the title ‘The Rivers Nursery of Sawbridgeworth‘. There was also an article about the conservation of a remaining orchard on the site of the Nursery on this Blog: – ‘The Rescued Orchard and the Rivers Heritage’ by Paul Read. For more information on the Rivers Heritage Site and Orchard go to: www.rhso.co.uk

In brief this is a book of 200 pages illustrated with old photographs and maps. It is the story of an outstanding contributor to the history of fruit growing in Britain. A long-established family firm (1725 – 1987), the Thomas Rivers directors and the many local men and women who worked on the land and in the greenhouses developed the Conference pear and Early Rivers plum as well as apple varieties and oranges. The agricultural history of East Hertfordshire is entwined with the rise and fall of the business.

To purchase this book for £15 plus p&p, email www.rhso.co.uk

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