Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘apples’

Beurré Hardy, Red Beurré Hardy pear painted by Elisabeth Dowle. Copyright Elisabeth Dowle.
Published in The Book of Pears by Joan Morgan (2015); Ebury Press

Elisabeth Dowle is internationally recognised as one of our leading botanic artists and now there is an opportunity to see many of her best-known works in an exhibition at Cannon Hall Museum, Barnsley, Yorkshire. The exhibition opened on 24 May 2019 and continues until 3 November 2019: http://www.cannon-hall.com/pears-and-apples-the-botanical-illustration-of-elisabeth-dowle

The Cannon Hall exhibition includes 12 of Elisabeth’s apple paintings and 15 of her paintings of pears. The exhibition is displayed in two adjoining rooms, creating intimate spaces and truly cabinets of treasures in which the paintings really sparkle. Well worth a detour if you are in Yorkshire over the summer.

Pear paintings fill the first room and there is special emphasis on the pears, as Cannon Hall has an historic collection of trained pear trees growing in a walled fruit and vegetable garden, close to the house. A number of these pear trees are very old, probably dating back to the nineteenth century, when the gardens were in their prime. The famous Cannon Hall Muscat grape was raised here and the original vine  continues to thrive in one of the glass houses.

Elisabeth has been awarded seven Royal Horticultural Society’s Gold Medals for her water colour paintings. The paintings featured in Cannon Hall exhibition were used to illustrate The Book of Pears by Joan Morgan (2015) and The Book of Apples/The New Book of Apples (1993, 2002)  by Joan Morgan and Alison Richards; published by Ebury Press. These paintings were made from pears and apples growing in the National Fruit Collection, Brogdale, Kent. Elisabeth’s work has been used to illustrate other books, featured on porcelain and calendars and are held in a number of private collections and institutions.

Fruit Forum

 

Pear trees trained against a wall at Cannon Hall

 

Cannon Hall Muscat grape fruiting at Cannon Hall

Read Full Post »

Ribston Pippin blosssom

The question I’m going to ask you is a curiosity and I’m having a hard time finding information about it; maybe I didn’t know how to search well. I clarify that I am Spanish and although the English language is not unknown to me to access certain information is not easy. I am looking for the name and as much information as possible about the apple varieties that the musician Gerald Finzi cultivated on his farm in Aldbourne, Wiltshire. It’s a historical curiosity, mixed with my interest in music and one of my first works, fruit growing. I would be very grateful if you could help me.

José María Bárcena Álvarez

 

The composer Gerald Finzi collected varieties of apples and other fruits, which he planted in his Wiltshire orchard. He was a member of a group of enthusiasts who set out to rescue old fruit varieties and especially apples that they remembered, but which were fast disappearing from orchards and gardens. They were active in the 1940s and 1950s and led by Philip Morton Shand, a linguist and writer on modern architecture, wine and food. Other key players were the architect [Sir] Leslie Martin and a Miss Holliday who lived in Yorkshire. Shand wrote articles, made a broadcast and organised a network of helpers all over the country. The group built up their own collections and their discoveries of ‘rare’ fruits were given to the Fruit Collection at the Royal Horticultural Society Gardens at Wisley, Surrey the forerunner of today’s National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, Kent. For more details on the Collection see: Morgan, J., ‘Orchard Archives: The National Fruit Collection’ in Occasional Papers from the RHS Lindley Library, vol 7, pp.3-30, 2012

Fruit Forum

 

Read Full Post »

Delgollune, raised by French nurseryman George Delbard

We have just purchased a property in the Manche region of Normandy and with the property we have over 400 apple tress which produce between 8 – 10 tonnes of fruit. These trees have been looked after by a next door neighbour for many years and, even to our untrained eye, look in need of some proper care. Where could we go to learn about keeping an orchard? How can we identify our apples? Also the next door neighbour informs us that the local cooperative which used to take them now buys its apples from Spain! In the short term ie October this year (as we do not move permanently until next summer), any thoughts on what we could do with our harvest, rather than leave it to rot.

Sue and Kevin Robinson

 

There may be something of use in an article on our main web-site:  http://www.fruitforum.net/growing-apples-organically-in-normandy.htm

Read Full Post »

Beauty of Bath

I have an espalier Beauty of Bath, but the apples are disappointing. Is it worth keeping?

Simon Bishop

 

Read Full Post »

Keswick Codlin, an early cooking apple variety that arose in North West England

I am a farmer in the south Pennines (I have recently taken over the farm from my now retired parents) and am looking to plant some more apple and pear varieties best suited to our climate. I’m hoping to plant around 15 – 20 trees in 2018 and look forward to using this resource to research what varieties to get. If there is anyone reading this based in the North West who has the time to offer advice to someone such as myself please do feel free to get in touch. Our farm website has our contact details on: www.cronkshawfoldfarm.co.uk.

Dorothy McCarthy

And please post your suggestions and comments below and we will pass them on.

We asked Hilary Wilson to give us some suggestions which are posted below – Comment number 3. Hilary  is a great authority on the apples  of the North West and has spent many years identifying and searching for varieties that do well in her native Cumbria, where she also farmed.

Fruit Forum

Read Full Post »

Class 11: Best Collection of Fruit at the RHS Autumn Show 2015 won by Adrian Baggaley

Class 11: ‘Best Collection of Fruit’ at the RHS Autumn Show 2015 won by Adrian Baggaley. Front row, left to right: Howgate Wonder, Mère de Ménage, Reverend W Wilks. Middle row left to right: Conference, Concorde, Pitmaston Duchess. Back row, left to right: Norfolk Royal Russset, Fiesta, Red Devil. The dish of Fiesta in this collection also won the E. J. White Trophy for the best single dish of fruit in the show.

For a number of years we have reported the amazing successes achieved by Adrian Baggaley at the Royal Horticultural Society fruit shows. This year he has excelled and even beaten his own records. He entered 40 classes and won 35 of them at the RHS Autumn Show on 6-7 October 2015. These included ‘Firsts’ for the ‘Best Dish of Apples’, the Best Dish of Pears’ and the  most challenging of all the ‘Best Collection of Fruit’, that is, nine perfectly matched and flawless dishes of apples and pears! To achieve this level of success, you need to be very dedicated – take a look at  Adrian’s article ‘Growing for Showing‘ on our main website.  Well done Adrian!

Fruit Forum

Read Full Post »

King's Acre Pippin apple

King’s Acre Pippin apple

We will track the progress of fruit blossom during the coming weeks through its development in the National Fruit Collection at Brogdale, near Faversham, Kent. Our guide is Lorinda Jewsbury, who is going to give us information on a number of varieties in the Collection: dates when 10% of the buds are open, the tree is in full flower and when 90% of the petals have fallen. The varieties that Lorinda records are listed below with the dates observed so far. Updates will follow as we advance through blossom time.

The year’s season held off from 2014’s early show of flowers, with the apricots, plums, cherries and pears opening their blooms a good 2-3 weeks later than last year. In mid-April we had a few unusually warm and sunny days, which really set the blooms in motion. One moment there was barely a pear tree in blossom, the next saw the orchard awash with white flowers.

For the plums, a cluster of warm days gave a boost to the flowering times, with just 1-2 days between ‘10% of blossom open’ and ‘full flower’ for a number of varieties. It also gave a boost to the bees, butterflies and numerous other insects that appeared to be enjoying the sea of open flowers in the orchard. Hopefully they will have done a good job at pollinating the flowers for us and, weather permitting, a good crop will follow.

Lorinda Jewsbury

2015

PLUM

Cambridge Gage: 15th April (10% open); 16th April (full flower)

Czar: 7th April (10% open); 11th April (full flower)

Denniston’s Superb (Imperial Gage): 11th April (10% open); 14th April (full flower)

Farleigh Damson: 13th April (10% open); 15th April (full flower)

Marjorie’s Seedling: 15th April (10% open); 16th April (full flower)

Oullins Gage: 14th April (10% open); 15th April (full flower)

Pershore Yellow Egg: 14th April (10% open); 15th April (full flower)

Victoria: 13th April (10% open); 15th April (full flower)

PEAR

Concorde: 21st April (10% open)

Conference: 20th April (10% open)

Doyenne du Comice: 21st April (10% open)

Louise Bonne of Jersey: 15th April (10% open); 19th April (full flower)

CHERRY

Early Rivers: 16th April (10% open); 20th April (full flower)

Hertford: 18th April (10% open); 22nd April (full flower)

Lapins: 15th April (10% open); 18th April (full flower)

Merchant: 20th April (10% open)

Stella: 20th April (10% open)

Sunburst: 21st April (10% open)

APPLE

Blenheim Orange:

Bramley’s Seedling:

Cox’s Orange Pippin:

Crawley Beauty:

Discovery:

Egremont Russet:

Falstaff:

Feuillemorte:

Fiesta/Red Pippin:

Gala:

James Grieve:

Jonagold:

Meridian:

Red Astrachan: 16th April (10% open); 21st April (full flower)

St. Edmund’s Pippin:

Worcester Pearmain:

 

See below, in first comment,  for a course on pollination 26-28 June 2015 in Cambridge UK

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »