Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘dating pear tree’

Louise Bonne of Jersey pear used to be planted all over Britain. It arose before 1780 in Normandy and came to England via Jersey in 1820.

We have a very large pear tree on an allotment site in York. It is similar in size to the one on your blog and looks fantastic when in flower. We are wondering how to age it and find out what variety it is. The allotment site dates from 1917 and the pear tree is next to a footpath, which is shown on maps from 1850s but could be present much earlier. The allotment tenant is not very keen on the tree as a lot of the fruit falls from such a great height and is wasted. We hope to find out if the tree has historical significance and plan to help with picking the fruit too. Can you give us any advice?

Sara Robin

 

 

Hessle pear, which arose in the village of Hessle near Hull, Yorks; first recorded 1827.

 

Fruit identification sessions for apples and pears are held all over the country during September and October.

You can turn to the fruit books for descriptions of varieties and submit samples of leaves for DNA fingerprinting.

In Yorkshire, Royal Horticultural Society Garden Harlow Carr, near Harrogate, has fruit identification days and the Northern Fruit Group holds sessions and gives advice.

Brogdale Collections at Brogdale, home of the National Fruit Collection, identifies fruit by post.

There are a number of reference books you could use:

The Book of Pears by Joan Morgan (2015), illustrated by Elisabeth Dowle and the companion website with photographs of nearly 500 varieties in the Directory section https://www.thebookofpears.fruitforum.net

Pears by Jim Arbury (1997), illustrations by Sally Pinhey

Handbook of Hardy Fruits (1920) vol. I, by Edward Bunyard

The Fruit Manual by Robert Hogg, 1884, reprinted 2002

Apple and pear varieties can also be identified by DNA fingerprinting using the leaves, see Fruit ID website

Fruit Forum

Advertisements

Read Full Post »